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Spicy Fish Taco Bowls

15 Mar 2019

These spicy fish bites are an amazing way to get more flavour from your protein! The seasoning itself can be used on many other proteins like chicken or tofu. Recipe serves 3 // macros per serving... 378 Calories - 35g Protein - 47g Carbs - 6g Fats Ingredients - 350g raw basa fillets - 1 tsp chilli powder - 1 tsp cumin powder - 1 tsp paprika - 2 tbsp buckwheat flour - 2 cups cabbage, shredded - 100g greek yoghurt - 2 green onions, chopped - 1 juice of a lime - 1 tsp garlic paste - 1 tbsp olive oil - 1 tbsp water - sprinkle of salt - 375g cooked brown rice & quinoa Method Slice basa fillets into bite sized bits. In a bowl mix chilli, cumin, paprika, herbs & flour together. Add a small amount of oil into your pan and heat on medium/high heat. Pat fish dry with paper towel then coat in dry mixture. Place onto pan and cook for 3-4 mins each side until golden and cooked through. You will know the fish is done once the meat is white and flaky after being pulled apart. Divide the cooked fish into 3 containers evenly. Do the same with the cooked rice. For the slaw, blend together the oil, water, garlic, lime juice, green onion & salt. Once mixed add in the yoghurt and blend again. Pour the sauce on the cabbage and fold through.  Divide your cabbage slaw into the 3 containers. Serve with lime, avocado or any other garnishes.
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Education
Food for thoughts… healthy eating for your mind, body and soul

27 Feb 2019

“Your health is what you make of it. Everything you do and think either adds to the vitality, energy and spirit you possess or takes away from it.” Ann Wigmore Eating healthy whole foods and leading a lifestyle to match has a myriad of benefits such as looking good, performing better and having more energy but have you ever considered the benefits of healthy eating for your mental wellbeing. The food we eat is linked to our mood, emotions, and behavior and affects how we think and feel. Here are eight ways to nutritionally boost your mood and optimise your foods to look after your mind while you nourish your body. Eat healthy fats – especially ones rich in omega-3 fatty acids play an important role in how the brain functions and reducing neuro-inflammation which is associated with depression. Sources of omega-3 fats include seeds, walnuts, and oysters, although the highest amounts exist in oily fish such as salmon, sardines, and mackerel. Eat foods which contain tryptophan. Tryptophan is an amino acid (the building blocks of proteins) and is required to produce serotonin. Serotonin is thought to stabilise moods, and reduced levels have been found in people with depression. Foods that naturally support tryptophan levels include seeds, nuts, cheese, oats, and meats. Vitamin D does more than just is vital in activating the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin. Few foods are rich in vitamin D, with oily fish topping the list, but the best source is sunshine. B vitamins, including folate (B9), play an important role in producing chemicals in the brain that regulate mood. The best way to ensure adequate B vitamins is to consume a healthy, varied diet. B12 can be tricky for those on plant pased diets, if this is you soy products and nutritional yeast are good sources. Cut back on the sugar! When we over consume sugar, it’s poorly digested and passes into the colon. There it fuels the growth of “bad” bacteria, which can wreak havoc on your health, promoting inflammation and disrupting the healthy ecology of your gut microbiome. The majority of serotonin is made in your gut, which is influenced by the health of your gutbiome. Choose complex carbs. Complex carbohydrates are more slowly digested and offer a gradual release of energy into the blood stream. They also support the body’s natural detox systems and promote the activity of desirable gut bacteria. Try adding more root vegetables, legumes, and buckwheat to your diet. Fermented foods. Cultured and fermented foods promote a healthy gut, which can lead to a more positive mood. Food choices include yogurt, kefir, fermented vegetables, sauerkraut, pickles, and kimchee. Drink water! It’s essential for the trillions of tiny chemical reactions that energize us throughout the day and stabilize our mood. Dehydration can cause fatigue and irritability, and drinking water is the best way to stay hydrated.
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Exercise
CrossFit Open Nutrition Tips

27 Feb 2019

Open season is here! The CrossFit Open is run in every CrossFit affiliate worldwide, there is a lot of hype and excitement for every CrossFitter at this time of the year and whether you are part of the 1% that will qualify for Regionals to have a shot at the Games or like the rest of us just aiming to do our very best each week nutrition can make all the difference, not only to how you feel on the day but how you recover and how well your body holds up over 5 weeks! We may not know what the workouts are but we do know they will all be tough and make us test different skills and fitness components to the limit! Ensuring your nutrition is on point will help you in 18.5 the same way it did in 18.1 – while also keeping up your training in between events! The Open, from a nutritional standpoint, is all about fuelling and recovering. To do this you need to make sure you are eating ENOUGH food. We don’t recommend any of our clients that are taking part in the open reduce their macros during this time. The focus now is what foods can I eat and when to sustain the competition. We know each workout will be very demanding and attempting on calorie deficit won’t let you bring the same intensity and could impact your recovery. So what do we recommend our clients do come Open time? Before we get to that know that you don’t HAVE to change anything. These are just some general recommendations, many of which you may already be doing! If you are feeling good in your training and happy with your energy levels there is something to be said for sticking to what you know. The day before Increase your carbs by 50% the day before you hit The Open workout. These workouts are challenging and performed with competition intensity so you will be relying heavily on your glycogen stores – getting in the extra carbs the day before will ensure these stores are full come game day. We recommend hitting you carb goals with whole grains – oats, sweet potato, brown rice, quinoa and staying away from refined carbohydrates which can cause bloating. If you are working with a coach, first make sure they recommend this approach for you! I.e If you usually have 200g per day the day before the Open this would increase to 300g (200 x 1.5). Open Day This is the big day! You will be able to utilise some additional carbs today as well. A general recommendation is to have an additional  ½ BW pre and post workout. So if you weigh 60kg you can have up to an additional 30g before and after your workout. If weightloss is one of your goals and you are worried about the additional intake of carbohydrates from the day before and the day of your workout you can deduct the total g of additional carbs you have consumed over these two days from your allowance the day after. This will mean you are hitting your quota across the week. Tips for pre-workout The timing and manipulation of the amounts of protein carbs and fats you have pre workout could be what gives the extra edge and optimise your performance. TIP FROM KAYLA: Beetroot is great to include in your pre workout nutrition as it increases nitrate oxide production in your body which expands your blood vessels and increases oxygen to your cells. 2-3 hours before your workout This time-frame gives you time to digest and supplies your body with vitamins and minerals for optimal organ and muscle function. This is the time for a ‘meal’. Carbs: Whatever the workout entails eat a mix of high and low-GI carbs. Protein: Exercise damages muscle tissue, but protein keeps amino acids stocked while promoting protein synthesis. Make sure this meal includes a bit of lean protein. Fats: Fat slows the digestion of food so eat some but keep it minimal. This will ensure that the protein and carbs you’re eating are more effectively utilised. 30 minutes before your workout If you need to eat within an hour of your workout – say you are completing early in the morning. Carbs: With less time to digest whole food, stick with high-GI carbs. Examples include (but are in no way limited to) white rice, fruit, baby food, fuel pouches, carb/protein shakes. They digest easier and absorb quicker. Protein: Protein is important and we recommend opting for a whey protein shake because it is fast digesting. Fats: Fat should be mostly avoided this meal, it further slows digestion and you want those nutrients utilised as quickly as possible! Caffeine: Coffee or pre workout if you are taking something to give you a boost now is the time! Post workout tips After each workout, you’re going to feel hungry and your body is going to want all the food it can get to begin the recovery process. So when the body settles, ensure your get those easy to digest nutrients in and that you can have those extra macros as needed to feel good and so we can stay strong over the next few weeks. 0-2 hours after your workout This meal enhances your recovery for the next day and the earlier you can refuel, the better! The Open is more challenging than your average day at the gym and your body won’t be recovering as quickly as usual. The sooner you’re refueled and kicking into ‘recovery mode,’ the more prepared you’ll be for the next workout. Carbs: Carbs replenish glycogen stores, particularly right after a heavy workout. This is when you want to get your simple carbs in – bananas are great as they are high-GI so will act quickly to restore that glycogen. Protein: Eat protein ASAP. Protein will continue promoting muscle maintenance and growth. The easiest option for this time frame is a protein shake. Fats: Keep fat intake low here: Fat will slow the release of glycogen and decrease the rate of  protein and carb digestion (which means a longer time before your fuel can aid in recovery!) 2-3 hours after your workout This is when you can have a proper meal, which includes protein, complex carbs (sweet potato, rice etc) and fats. Ginger and turmeric are perfect to include with this meal as they have anti-inflammatory properties which will lessen the effects of muscle damage that the Open workout may have done to your body. Hydration If there was ever a time to up your hydration game it is now! Guaranteed that without hydration, your performance during the CrossFit Open won’t go as well as it could. The workouts themselves will significantly decrease your electrolytes. Up your regular water intake (we recommend our clients aim for 3L per day), include coconut water in your post workout nutrition (is a carb) and add himalayan salts to your water as this will increase hydration and get in more minerals to your system. As we heard from James Newbury during our Open Nutrition  FB Live event. Stick with what you know. If your current diet works for you then don’t make drastic changes. Now is not the time to reduce calories, try new foods or or add new supplements. Sudden changes in diet can cause your body to retain water, have a negative impact on your performance or both. Have a game-plan. Ensure you have a supply of any supplements you want to use and prepare your meals ahead of time. Hope this helps and gives you some ideas of how you can optimise your nutrition for your next Open workout. Good luck for 18.2 x
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Recipes
7 Ways to Marinate Your Chicken

27 Feb 2019

Chicken is a very popular, lean protein source in meal prep!  But it can get pretty boring if you keep it the same... that's why we've found some popular marinades to make chicken taste even more delicious! ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ 🤫 Secret tip - you can actually marinate anything with these amazing mixes! The trick is to let the protein source absorb the flavour over time. ⏱ 2-24 hours depending on what your schedule allows! Proteins that also goes well with these marinades - steak, tofu or salmon! ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣Keep it frozen or fridge fresh - the choice is yours.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ Cilantro, Lime Marinade ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣   ✖️ 1 tbsp olive oil, 1tbsp lime juice, 2 tsp honey, 1/4 cup cilantro leaves (chopped), 1 clove garlic (minced), 1/8 tsp salt.⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Sweet Chilli Marinade ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣   ✖️ 3 tbsp sweet chilli sauce, 1 1/2 tbsp soy sauce, 2 tbsp water. ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Jerk Chicken Marinade ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ✖️ 1/2 tsp dried thyme leaves, 1/2 tsp ground allspice, 1tbsp brown sugar, 1/4 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp pepper, 1tsp garlic powder, 1/4 tsp cinnamon, 1/4 tsp cayenne, 1 tbsp olive oil, 1 tbsp lime juice. ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Lemon, Ginger Marinade ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ✖️ 1 tbsp olive oil, 1 tsp lemon juice, 1 tsp minced ginger, 1/8 tsp salt, 1/8 tsp chilli flakes. ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Honey, Garlic Marinade ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ✖️ 1tbsp olive oil, 1tbsp soy sauce, 2tbsp honey, 1 clove garlic (minced), 2tbsp water.⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Yoghurt Curry Marinade ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ✖️ 2tbsp yoghurt, 1 tsp lime juice, 1/8 tsp salt, 1 tsp curry powder, 1/2 tsp brown sugar. ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Chipotle, Lime Marinade ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ✖️ 1tbsp olive oil, 1 tsp adobo sauce, 1/4 tsp paprika, 1tsp brown sugar, 1 clove garlic (minced), 1 tbsp lime juice, 1/8 tsp salt. ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣
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General
Tia-Clair Toomey Joins The Method!

27 Feb 2019

We’re pumped to see Tia Clair Toomey, 2017 Fittest Woman On Earth and 2018 Commonwealth Games Gold Medallist joining The Method Now team! The Method Now will be providing advice to Tia and help optimise her nutrition in the lead up to the 2018 CrossFit Games and beyond. As a world-class athlete, Tia knows about the difference the right nutrition can make: “I’m working hard every day, physically and mentally, to become fitter and stronger. The decisions about what I fuel my body with can make all the difference in achieving my goals. At the same time, I don’t want to be too restricted in what I can and can’t eat. I love my Tim Tam’s, so they have to be written into my macro plan.” The Method’s macro-based nutrition planning allows flexibility in your diet, nothing is off the cards, not even Tim Tam’s. It’s all about finding the right balance of protein, fat and carbohydrates. You don’t have to be a Gold Medallist to benefit from The Method’s personalised services. Our experienced nutrition and lifestyle coaches provide one-on-one coaching and support, tailored to your specific goals whether that be losing, gaining or keeping weight, increasing physical performance or simply enhancing your well-being. Contact us to find out more or Get Started with your transformation. We’ll be following Tia’s journey closely and will have a closer look at Tia’s Secrets of Strength over the coming weeks. Stay tuned!
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General
Why We Track Macros not Calories

27 Feb 2019

We are often getting asked what the difference is between counting calories and tracking macros? For a long time, the general consensus has been that if you want to lose weight, you need consume fewer calories than you are burning, creating a caloric deficit. Easy! Calories in, calories out. Just do more and have less. While this is true for the most part, but not all calories are created equally and counting calories alone can be too vague and broad. If we were to look at a 1,500 calorie diet, you could make that up by eating four slices of chocolate cake or 375 strawberries, neither of which would be a great idea! This is why we look beyond calories, and have another measurement: macros – because in order to be the healthiest version of ourselves, not only do we need to know how much we are eating (enter calories) but it’s also important to ensure that we are getting enough of each of the vital macro-nutrients: Protein, Carbs and Fats. The above macros make up most of the calories we consume, and rather than focusing just on calories, it’s important to make sure they are coming from each source, at the correct ratio for us and our goals. Each macro plays a different yet vital role in our bodies. Protein is essential to build lean muscle mass while in a caloric deficit and also for muscle growth and repair. If our goals are to lose weight, the last thing we want is to sacrifice muscle tone. Likewise, if we are wanting to gain, we want it to be in muscle NOT fat. Carbs are our bodies go to source for energy in training, and are also vital for the recovery process as they help restore glycogen stores. Carbs are great for pre and post workout to help us fuel and recover our energy sources. Fats are needed to support the body’s digestion and cardiovascular health, not to mention keeping that hair shiny!! We also need to keep fats at a healthy level for general health and hormone regulation. Make you macros work for your goals. If you are someone that just wants to maintain a healthy balanced diet having the right amount of calories is important and will allow to you control your body’s ability to lose or gain weight. However, counting your macros will ensure that you maintain muscle mass, and minimise body fat – allowing your body to transform in the most ideal way. Additionally, if you have a very specific goal, or are an athlete in a specific sport, counting your macros will allow you to specifically fuel your training & recovery, allowing you to go harder in each session – giving you the edge above your competitors. Remember, the macro split of a triathlete is going to look very different to that of a ballet dancer or CrossFitter!  Having the right caloric intake is still important but by looking beyond this and counting macros means you are able to tailor your nutrition to your goals and ensure you eating a balanced healthy diet.
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Education
What is Iron, and why is it so important?

27 Feb 2019

Coach Jasmine gives us the run down on Iron • What is it and why is it important? Iron is an important component of haemoglobin, the substance in red blood cells that carries oxygen around our body in our blood. Iron also plays a vital role in energy production within the cell. Hence why when we are low in iron we will often experience fatigue as a side effect. • Types of iron: There are two types of iron. Haem iron (animal sources such as meat, fish, seafood and offal) and non-haem iron (plant-based source such as legumes, nuts, green leafy veggies and whole grains). The main difference between these two sources is the bioavailability (absorption) and amount of iron these foods contain. The amount of iron and it’s bioavailability is a lot higher in haem iron which can make it difficult for vegetarians or vegans to reach their recommend daily intake for iron. • Increasing iron absorption: There are certain foods that’s can actually enhance or inhibit iron absorption which can very useful (or detrimental) for vegetarians/ vegans or for those struggling to consume sufficient iron.  ▫️Calcium actually inhibits iron absorption so aim to consume dairy products in particular away from iron-containing foods. ▫️Tea, coffee and soft drinks also inhibit absorption due to these products containing a high amount of tannins (tannic acid). Therefore, consume tea/ coffee approximately 2 hours before or after iron-containing foods rather than at the same time. ▫️Vitamin C and vitamin A actually increase iron absorption meaning that pairing fruits and veggies with iron-containing foods will increase the amount of iron your body absorbs. Foods high in vitamin C include cherries, oranges, melons, kiwi fruit, lemons, broccoli and Brussel sprouts. In regards to foods high in vitamin A think oranges, carrots, sweet potatoes, apricots, mangoes and green leafy veggies.
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Recipes
Honey, Sesame Chicken Meal Prep

27 Feb 2019

  A simple meal prep idea that's easy on the budget, light on the macros but can pack one hell of a punch of flavour. The fun doesn't stop there - with such a basic recipe, it can be yours to experiment with. Here's a few ideas to change it up...   Change the sauce - to teriyaki, sweet chilli, peanut satay or honey mustard.   Change the carbs - to brown rice & quinoa, wild rice or noodles.   Change the veggies - to capsicum, boy choy, carrots, sprouts or cabbage.   Macros per serve // serves 4 495 Cals, 41g protein, 69g carbs, 6g fats.   Ingredients   Honey Sesame Sauce - 60ml chicken stock or water - 4 tbsp soy sauce - 4 tbsp honey - 1 tbsp sesame oil - 1/2 tsp red chilli flakes - 1tsp cornstarch   Chicken Bowl - 520g basmati rice, cooked - 1 tbsp olive oil - 3 cups broccoli, chopped - 3 cups snap peas - 520g chicken breast, raw - salt & pepper - sesame seeds, to garnish   Method    Shake together all sauce ingredients, set aside. Heat olive oil in large pan and cook broccoli & snap pears for 5 minutes until bright and green. Remove greens from pan. Add more oil if needed and cook chicken for 7 minutes, or until cooked through. Add in sauce for 2 minutes until it thickens. Evenly divide rice, greens & chicken into 4 containers. Garnish with sesame seeds.
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Recipes
Coriander Lime Pesto

27 Feb 2019

• Coriander Lime Pesto 🌿 —————————————. ➕ i n g r e d i e n t s 🥄 . * Large bunch of coriander * Handful of baby spinach leaves * 1 small clove garlic, crushed * 60 g (¼ cup) cashew nuts, toasted * 30 g (2 tablespoons) of parmesan cheese, finely grated * Juice and zest one fresh lime * 20 ml (1 tablespoon) macadamia oil (increase if you are going to use it as a sauce) * Small red chilli (optional) . . . ➕ m e t h o d👩🏼‍🍳 . 1. In a food processor grate the parmesan and set aside.  2. Place the coriander, spinach and cashews in the processor and pulse until just chopped.  3. Mix in the parmesan, lime juice and zest, garlic and macadamia oil (and optional chill) until combined. 4. You have control over the texture of this pesto. For a chunky pesto process less, or smoother process more. . . . ➕ n u t r i t i o n a l i n f o 📊 . — Based on 4 generous serves — Protein 6g | Carbs 6g | Fats 13g —————————————.
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