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Turkey Burgers With a Twist!

27 Feb 2019

⁣You’ll definitely want to save this sweet potato burger recipe! ✴️ They’re packed with flavour, didn’t take long at all to make and they’re sure to be a hit with anyone. These burgs are gluten & dairy free - but feel free to choose any toppings you’d like 🥑🧀🧂 With simple ingredients that are affordable you are in for a real treat. Perfect ratios for hitting your macros 📊⁣⁣ ⁣ Here are also some hidden benefits...⁣ ⁣ ✅ Lean Ground Turkey > Beef Mince - Helps lower your total fat intake for the day by using a lean meat source packed with more grams protein per 100g.⁣⁣ ⁣ ✅ Sweet Potato > Burger Buns - It’s a not brainer as it adds to your fiber content for the day plus it won’t boost your blood sugar too quickly = steady energy.   Ingredients - 500g Turkey Mince - 1/3 cup spinach - 1/2 diced capsicum - 1tsp cumin - 1/4 cup cilantro - 1/2tsp chilli flakes - 1tsp chilli powder - 1/2 tsp garlic powder - 800g sweet potato rounds *100g per round roughly.   Method   Heat oven to 200C   Slice sweet potato into thick rounds and place on baking paper. Spray lightly with oil and cook in oven for 30-35 minutes.    Combine rest of ingredients in large bowl and mix together to form patties.   Heat oil in pan on medium, then place burger patties in pan and let cook for 5-8 minutes either side. Cover pan with lid to speed up cooking time.   Form burgers with sweet potato rounds, mixed greens, avocado and condiments.    Macros. (for patties and sweet potato bun) Serves 4. Per serve, Calories 315, Protein 27g, Carbs 41g, Fats 5g.  
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Education
Food for thoughts… healthy eating for your mind, body and soul

6 May 2019

“Your health is what you make of it. Everything you do and think either adds to the vitality, energy and spirit you possess or takes away from it.” Ann Wigmore Eating healthy whole foods and leading a lifestyle to match has a myriad of benefits such as looking good, performing better and having more energy but have you ever considered the benefits of healthy eating for your mental wellbeing. The food we eat is linked to our mood, emotions, and behavior and affects how we think and feel. Here are eight ways to nutritionally boost your mood and optimise your foods to look after your mind while you nourish your body. Eat healthy fats – especially ones rich in omega-3 fatty acids play an important role in how the brain functions and reducing neuro-inflammation which is associated with depression. Sources of omega-3 fats include seeds, walnuts, and oysters, although the highest amounts exist in oily fish such as salmon, sardines, and mackerel. Eat foods which contain tryptophan. Tryptophan is an amino acid (the building blocks of proteins) and is required to produce serotonin. Serotonin is thought to stabilise moods, and reduced levels have been found in people with depression. Foods that naturally support tryptophan levels include seeds, nuts, cheese, oats, and meats. Vitamin D does more than just is vital in activating the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin. Few foods are rich in vitamin D, with oily fish topping the list, but the best source is sunshine. B vitamins, including folate (B9), play an important role in producing chemicals in the brain that regulate mood. The best way to ensure adequate B vitamins is to consume a healthy, varied diet. B12 can be tricky for those on plant pased diets, if this is you soy products and nutritional yeast are good sources. Cut back on the sugar! When we over consume sugar, it’s poorly digested and passes into the colon. There it fuels the growth of “bad” bacteria, which can wreak havoc on your health, promoting inflammation and disrupting the healthy ecology of your gut microbiome. The majority of serotonin is made in your gut, which is influenced by the health of your gutbiome. Choose complex carbs. Complex carbohydrates are more slowly digested and offer a gradual release of energy into the blood stream. They also support the body’s natural detox systems and promote the activity of desirable gut bacteria. Try adding more root vegetables, legumes, and buckwheat to your diet. Fermented foods. Cultured and fermented foods promote a healthy gut, which can lead to a more positive mood. Food choices include yogurt, kefir, fermented vegetables, sauerkraut, pickles, and kimchee. Drink water! It’s essential for the trillions of tiny chemical reactions that energize us throughout the day and stabilize our mood. Dehydration can cause fatigue and irritability, and drinking water is the best way to stay hydrated.
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Education Food tips & strategies
Eating for immunity support

28 Jun 2020

Contribution by Amanda Bunn (@amandabunn)   Amanda Bunn is a New Zealand-based coach with The Method Now. In her “spare time”, she’s an emergency department doctor, CrossFit athlete, gym owner and coach. Here’s Amanda’s best advice on eating foods to support your immune system.   The body is full of biochemical defence systems that modulate our immune systems and make us more resilient against disease. By stimulating and upregulating some of these physiological factors, we can support the healthy function of our immune system.   Fruit and vegetables contain substances called phytonutrients, which, along with a host of other beneficial properties, enhance immunity – so the very best thing you can do to support your immunity is eat a diet rich in a variety of fruits and vegetables. All the colours offer different benefits and some even work synergistically to have a more powerful effect - so aim to eat the colours of the rainbow every day.   Fibre is also a key part or your immunity arsenal. It helps keep your gut lining and microbiome healthy, which is has been linked extensively to a stronger and more adaptable immune system. Foods high in fibre include: All fruit & veg, especially beetroot, spinach, broccoli, kale, tomatoes, avocado, carrots, brussel sprouts, artichoke and sweet potato with the skin on. Berries (raspberries top this list, but all berries are good) and fruit with pulp - oranges, lemon, apple, banana. Legumes – black beans beat everything else for fibre content, as well as lentils and chickpeas. Almonds, walnuts, pecans or hazelnuts (all with the skin on).   The top three micronutrients to support immune function are: Vitamin D3, Vitamin C, and Zinc. It can be difficult to consume these in high quantities, so high quality supplementation can be beneficial.   Vitamin D is critical for health. Virtually every cell in the body has a vitamin D receptor, which, when bound to vitamin D, can influence the expression of more than 200 genes. It has a significant role in regulating immune function. There are two types of vitamin D: D2 (ergocalciferol) and D3 (cholecalciferol). D2 is made naturally by plants and D3 is the form your body naturally produces when it’s exposed to sunlight.   The easiest way to naturally boost vitamin D production is through exposure to sunlight; it’s recommended to aim for around 20 minutes of direct safe sun exposure per day. (There is a caveat to this through UV exposure and skin cancer, so you only want to be in sun exposure when the UV index is below 3. There is an app called UVIMate, which gives you real time information on the UV index in your area and thus if it is okay to be out in direct light.) Typically speaking exposure in the morning or later afternoon/early evening is best – early morning exposure has the added benefit of help with your circadian rhythm and sleep.   Top foods for vitamin D are: Fatty fish (i.e. tuna, salmon, sardines and mackerel), whole eggs, beef liver and cod liver oil.   Vitamin C is an antioxidant that animals produce in response to stress. Humans lost the ability to do this during our evolution and now have to obtain it from our diet. Vitamin C's role in immunity is related to glutathione, the body’s main antioxidant defence mechanism, which is produced in the liver. It protects against free radicals and helps to eliminate toxins. This is by far more powerful than antioxidant supplements or vitamins because the body will self-regulate glutathione’s role in the immune system.   Foods high in vitamin C include: Guava, capsicum (red and yellow), broccoli, cauliflower, kiwifruit, strawberries, tomatoes, sweet potato, kale and brussel sprouts.   Zinc is used for the function of more than 300 enzymes and more than 1,000 transcription factors (proteins that regulate the function of genes) in humans. It also plays an important role as a structural agent of proteins and cell membranes preventing oxidative stress. It promotes hormone production and immunity, as well as fighting against infections.   Top food sources of zinc include: Grass-fed red meat, shellfish (in particular oysters, crab, mussels and prawns/shrimp), pumpkin seeds, cashew nuts, cheddar cheese and dark chocolate (80%+).   It’s important that your immune system is supported by a healthy, balanced diet, as well as two other key factors: Prioritise getting enough sleep. Sleep supports your natural killer cells and forms part of your initial immune response. Managing stress as much as possible. Self-isolation is a great time to learn new stress-management techniques, such as meditation or breathwork. Stress plays a huge role in compromising the immune system, so if you’re someone who suffers from a lot of stress and anxiety, you might also notice you’re more susceptible to getting sick.
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Education
Eating more to lose weight

14 May 2019

Introduction It’s the oldest weight loss advice in the book: consume fewer calories than you expend, and you’ll lose weight. While this stands true for the short term, eating too few calories, and depriving yourself of certain food groups or macronutrients, can, in fact, sabotage your longer-term weight loss goals – and harm your health and mental state, too. While your body might initially respond to a drop in calorie consumption and increased exercise by losing fat, this only leads to a false sense of security. The human body is a dynamic, adaptable and complex machine, with survival as its top priority. In order to feel safe and manage change, it constantly – and miraculously – regulates what goes on internally in response to its environment and how we treat it. Here are a few things you need to know:   Risks associated with eating too little Our intention in highlighting the following health risks is not to scare you – rather inform you on why eating more (and eating better) might be a smarter and more sustainable means of losing weight and allowing you to achieve your body composition goals than by drastically reducing calorie consumption. When we cut too many calories from our diet or fail to adequately refuel ourselves following rigorous exercise, survival mode kicks in and our bodies respond by assuming these changed circumstances are the new norm (i.e. every day to come will look the same). In turn, it slows our metabolism down and holds onto the limited calories we give it. Not to mention: reducing active thyroid and sex hormone production; raising adrenal stress hormones like cortisol, potentially leading to insulin resistance (an unhealthy hormone state that promotes body fat and water retention and causes long term health issues); lowering blood pressure and reducing heart rate to unhealthy levels; electrolyte imbalances; hair loss and brittle fingernails; loss of menstrual periods in women; trouble concentrating, issues sleeping and potentially depression. It’s important to shift our focus from solely weight loss and external appearance, and to instead consider what – and how much – we eat as it relates to our broader health now and into the future. Our focus should be on adequately fuelling our bodies in a way that is sustainable. Hint: slow and steady wins the race.   How much and what to eat to support body composition change – sustainably In evaluating our individual dietary needs, we need to consider both what we eat and how much we eat. The amount of food our body needs depends on gender, height, age, general state of health, activity levels, genetics and body composition. It’s not as simple as calories in versus calories out when it comes to maintaining, losing or gaining weight healthily. The substance from which the calories are taken is integral. This is where macronutrients (“macros”) come into play. The three main components of the foods we eat are carbohydrates, protein and fat, the calorific values of which are different: 1g of both carbohydrates and protein contains 4 calories, while 1g of fat contains 9. However, rather than focussing solely on calories we suggest taking this one step further and thinking about the food components calories derive from.   Eating more and eating better There are some general things worth knowing when shifting focus from calories to macronutrients: Foods high in energy but low in nutritional value (e.g. doughnuts – yum!) provide empty calories. Our advice is certainly not to cut these foods out. After all, the goal is to adopt sustainable habits (and it’s going to be near impossible to avoid doughnuts for the rest of your life!). Instead, we recommend thinking about ‘empty calorie’ foods as occasional foods. There is a benefit in re-evaluating the ratio of your carbohydrates versus protein consumption – higher protein diets better support a ‘lean’ body composition, not to mention accelerated muscle recovery. Interestingly, your body uses more energy during the process of digesting proteins versus other macronutrients. Bigger muscles also require more energy to move – meaning you can burn more calories during the day without trying! Don’t you dare cut out fats entirely – instead, learn the difference between fats: saturated, monosaturated, polyunsaturated and trans; some of which are healthy, some of which are not. Foods high in healthy fats such as avocado, nuts and salmon should be included in diets to support weight loss – foods high in unhealthy fats (e.g. fast food) should be limited. Fibre and sugar are worth thinking about too. High fibre diets (aim for around 25g per day) support healthy digestive systems, reducing bloating and water retention. Further, eating too much sugar throws your blood sugar and insulin levels out of whack, wreaking havoc on your energy levels throughout the day. Micronutrients including calcium, sodium and iron (particularly for women) should be prioritised in healthy diets too. Tip: eat the rainbow. Generally speaking, the more colourful the food (we’re talking naturally coloured – fruits and vegetables, not candy), the more packed with micronutrients. If you want to be a leaner, healthier version of you, the easiest thing to do is to eat more whole, single-ingredient foods (insert: fruits and vegetables, lean animal-based proteins, grains, etc.). These foods are naturally filling, and you can eat substantial amounts of them without blowing out your calories. It’s very difficult to gain fat if most of your diet includes food your grandparents would have eaten as children.   Conclusion At the end of the day, your focus should be on nourishing your body instead of depriving it. Satisfy your hunger, treat yourself every now and again, and maintain focus on your longer-term health goals. Quick weight loss through calorie deprivation might allow you to lose weight ahead of a holiday or special event, but what’s the fun in a life of yoyo weight loss? None. Time to break the cycle. Speak to a nutritional professional about eating more but eating smarter. Then, once you don’t have to stress about food all the time, you can focus on other things! Yay!
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Recipes
Butter Chicken Meal Prep

27 May 2019

  With crispy, garlic naan (‘wrap’) bread. 😧🤗 Winter is coming here in Australia so it’s time to start looking for those heart warming meals to get us through the frost. 🙏🏼❄️ ⁣ ⁣ 🍃 Serves 2 // Macros per serve... ⁣ ➖ 459 calories ⁣ ➖ 50g protein ⁣ ➖ 55g carbohydrates ⁣ ➖ 3g fats ⁣ ⁣ 💥 Please see bottom of caption for garlic naan, not included in macros as every wrap brand will be different!! 💥⁣ ⁣ INGREDIENTS 🥄⁣ ➕ 300g raw chicken breast ⁣ ➕ 300g cooked basmati rice ⁣ ➕ 200g greek yoghurt ⁣ ➕ 1/2 cup tomato passata (tomato purée found near tomato pasta sauces) ⁣ ➕ 2 tsp Garam Masala (found in spices isle)⁣ ➕ 1 tsp coconut sugar ⁣ ➕ 1 tsp garlic paste ⁣ ➕ 1 tsp ginger paste ⁣ ➕ 2 tsp turmeric ⁣ ➕ 1 tsp cumin ⁣ ➕ 1/2 lemon juiced ⁣ ➕ salt to taste ⁣ ⁣ 💡 NOTE - taste curry sauce and add more tomato passata or chilli to increase sweetness or spice. ⁣ ⁣ METHOD ⁣ 1️⃣. Preheat oven to 180C. Cook chicken with dash of oil for 20 mins then shred with two forks once cooked through. ⁣ 2️⃣. In a small pan on low heat add all ingredients minus the rice and chicken. Stir until heated, do not burn. Taste and add more flavour if desired (see note above). ⁣ 3️⃣ Once sauce is heated and mixed well, add in shredded chicken then build meal with cooked rice and naan bread. ⁣ ⁣ For naan bread. Buy a healthy wrap, we used light wraps from Woolworths. Coat with a small amount of olive oil, garlic, parsley and salt. Bake for 5 mins in oven until crispy! 👌🏼🤗⁣
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Recipes
Fully Loaded Sweet Potatoes

27 Feb 2019

If there's ever been a time where you've thought, "Damn, I wish there was more I could do with sweet potato"... well your day just got a whole lot better!   There's two ways to go about this recipe...   1. Leave it how it is but change the protein filling and spices so that you don't get bored of the same meal. Try pesto shredded chicken or cheesy, scrambled tofu (made with nutritional yeast) next time! 2. Change your spud boat to thick, crunchy wedges. Chuck them in a bowl and let your filling melt over the fries for another 5 mins in the oven... hungry yet? Sweet potato is great for the gut & also a fantastic way to get your carbohydrates in for the day! Ingredients - 600g sweet potato - 1 tbsp coconut oil - 1 white onion, diced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 375g turkey mince (vegan option; chickpeas or crumbled tofu) - 1 tsp cayenne pepper - 2 tbsp tomato paste - 1 red capsicum, diced - 1 tsp salt   Lime Crema - 150g yoghurt (we used yopro) - Juice of a lime - Water (for desired consistency)   Method   1. Preheat oven to 200C. Poke potatoes with a fork a few times. 2. Cook for 60-70 minutes until you can easily pierce through the skin. Allow to cool before stuffing. 3. While potatoes are cooking, pan fry coconut oil, onion & garlic. Cook until softened. 4. Stir in spices, capsicum and tomato paste for 30 seconds. Stir in filling of choice with salt to season.  5. Slice potatoes down the centre then fill and garnish. 6. For lime crema, whisk ingredients. Garnish before serving!   Macros per serve // Serves 3 410 Calories, 35g Protein, 43g Carbs, 11g Fats
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General Food tips & strategies
A Day of Eating for Tia-Clair Toomey

4 Nov 2019

Fittest Woman in the World, Tia-Clair Toomey is a big part of the Method family working with Coach Simone to prepare for competitions and support her recovery. We caught up at Method HQ for a breakdown on what goes into fuelling her, other than Tim-Tams! Here's what she had to say:  “Nutrition is something I am constantly learning about on a daily basis and realising it’s not just great for my recovery but it allows me to live a healthier, happier balance of life. After seeing and experiencing first hand the importance nutrition has on my mind, body and soul, I want to ensure I’m staying on track. So for me, I have found doing Macros and having a nutrition coach/mentor takes away that pressure and stress of trying to figure it out by myself.  At the moment, my macros are P:140 C: 200-400 F: 80, the carbs really depend on what I have planned for the day in terms of training. I plan what I eat around sessions, and I'm not always strict with my tracking so I apologise about not having portions for you! Breakfast  Tonic to help inflammation & Digestive Support: Jamu, Cayenne Pepper, Manuka Honey, Cinnamon, Ginger, Turmeric, Apple Cider Vinegar.  Smoked Salmon & Eggs on Dark Rye bread with Kale or Scrambled Eggs on Toast    SESSION 1 Training in the morning is typically outdoors - I like to do non-gym exercise in the morning.  Today it was 21-15-9 DB burpee box step-up DB S2OH @20-25kg- Swim 200-400-600-400-200 With 2min between efforts  I'll have a True Protein Shake In between sessions and a coffee with Shane (always a small Skinny Cappucino with extra chocolate on top!)    Lunch Meat with Greens and Rice. Kombucha and Himalayan Salt to replace electrolytes and minerals, as well as a sneaky teaspoon of peanut butter  Recovery time! Peanut (or almond!) butter and banana wrap with honey before Session 2    SESSION 2 15min AMRAP 2017 CF Games Strongman’s fear WOD  80 pull-ups 70 gods 60 T2B 40 cal row 30 dead’s @100/140  Dinner  Chicken Breast, Sweet Potato and Vegetables cooked in Ghee  On treat night - Dessert Pancakes with Halo-Top, Maple Syrup and Grated Cadbury Chocolate on top  Pre-bed Supplements: Fish Oil, Vitamin C, SuperCells Vitamins and Superfeast Cordyceps Mushrooms”    
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Recipes
Savoury Vegetable Muffins (recipe via @themethodnow + @laurenn.ash)

25 Jan 2021

So it’s late afternoon and you’re hankering for a tasty snack that isn't too harsh on your macros… or maybe you’ve just wrapped your work out and NEED something NOW; well this is the recipe for you! Introducing these scrumptious Savoury Vegetable Muffins by long-time Method client Lauren; this recipe makes you approximately 12 servings so there’s enough for you to share with the crew or meal prep for as snacks all week long.   Macro facts: 158 cal (1 muffin) 13g carbs 7g protein 6g fat Here’s what you’ll need: 230g zucchini grated 205g carrots grated 125g frozen peas & corn 75g grated cheese (we used Bega light tasty) 125ml milk 105g greek yogurt 35ml olive oil 3 eggs 3tsp baking powder 160g wholemeal plain flour Now here’s the best part… they’re so simple and easy to make: Preheat the oven to 180 & line a muffin tray. Combine all ingredients in a bowl. Fill muffin papers. Bake for 30mins or until cooked through. If you whip this tasty snack up, we want to see it! Tag us in your pics on Instagram @themethodnow 🎉 
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Exercise
Nutrition Tips for High Intensity Training

14 May 2019

Open season is here! The CrossFit Open is run in every CrossFit affiliate worldwide, there is a lot of hype and excitement for every CrossFitter at this time of the year and whether you are part of the 1% that will qualify for Regionals to have a shot at the Games or like the rest of us just aiming to do our very best each week nutrition can make all the difference, not only to how you feel on the day but how you recover and how well your body holds up over 5 weeks! We may not know what the workouts are but we do know they will all be tough and make us test different skills and fitness components to the limit! Ensuring your nutrition is on point will help you in 18.5 the same way it did in 18.1 – while also keeping up your training in between events! The Open, from a nutritional standpoint, is all about fuelling and recovering. To do this you need to make sure you are eating ENOUGH food. We don’t recommend any of our clients that are taking part in the open reduce their macros during this time. The focus now is what foods can I eat and when to sustain the competition. We know each workout will be very demanding and attempting on calorie deficit won’t let you bring the same intensity and could impact your recovery. So what do we recommend our clients do come Open time? Before we get to that know that you don’t HAVE to change anything. These are just some general recommendations, many of which you may already be doing! If you are feeling good in your training and happy with your energy levels there is something to be said for sticking to what you know. The day before Increase your carbs by 50% the day before you hit The Open workout. These workouts are challenging and performed with competition intensity so you will be relying heavily on your glycogen stores – getting in the extra carbs the day before will ensure these stores are full come game day. We recommend hitting you carb goals with whole grains – oats, sweet potato, brown rice, quinoa and staying away from refined carbohydrates which can cause bloating. If you are working with a coach, first make sure they recommend this approach for you! I.e If you usually have 200g per day the day before the Open this would increase to 300g (200 x 1.5). Open Day This is the big day! You will be able to utilise some additional carbs today as well. A general recommendation is to have an additional  ½ BW pre and post workout. So if you weigh 60kg you can have up to an additional 30g before and after your workout. If weightloss is one of your goals and you are worried about the additional intake of carbohydrates from the day before and the day of your workout you can deduct the total g of additional carbs you have consumed over these two days from your allowance the day after. This will mean you are hitting your quota across the week. Tips for pre-workout The timing and manipulation of the amounts of protein carbs and fats you have pre workout could be what gives the extra edge and optimise your performance. TIP FROM KAYLA: Beetroot is great to include in your pre workout nutrition as it increases nitrate oxide production in your body which expands your blood vessels and increases oxygen to your cells. 2-3 hours before your workout This time-frame gives you time to digest and supplies your body with vitamins and minerals for optimal organ and muscle function. This is the time for a ‘meal’. Carbs: Whatever the workout entails eat a mix of high and low-GI carbs. Protein: Exercise damages muscle tissue, but protein keeps amino acids stocked while promoting protein synthesis. Make sure this meal includes a bit of lean protein. Fats: Fat slows the digestion of food so eat some but keep it minimal. This will ensure that the protein and carbs you’re eating are more effectively utilised. 30 minutes before your workout If you need to eat within an hour of your workout – say you are completing early in the morning. Carbs: With less time to digest whole food, stick with high-GI carbs. Examples include (but are in no way limited to) white rice, fruit, baby food, fuel pouches, carb/protein shakes. They digest easier and absorb quicker. Protein: Protein is important and we recommend opting for a whey protein shake because it is fast digesting. Fats: Fat should be mostly avoided this meal, it further slows digestion and you want those nutrients utilised as quickly as possible! Caffeine: Coffee or pre workout if you are taking something to give you a boost now is the time! Post workout tips After each workout, you’re going to feel hungry and your body is going to want all the food it can get to begin the recovery process. So when the body settles, ensure your get those easy to digest nutrients in and that you can have those extra macros as needed to feel good and so we can stay strong over the next few weeks. 0-2 hours after your workout This meal enhances your recovery for the next day and the earlier you can refuel, the better! The Open is more challenging than your average day at the gym and your body won’t be recovering as quickly as usual. The sooner you’re refueled and kicking into ‘recovery mode,’ the more prepared you’ll be for the next workout. Carbs: Carbs replenish glycogen stores, particularly right after a heavy workout. This is when you want to get your simple carbs in – bananas are great as they are high-GI so will act quickly to restore that glycogen. Protein: Eat protein ASAP. Protein will continue promoting muscle maintenance and growth. The easiest option for this time frame is a protein shake. Fats: Keep fat intake low here: Fat will slow the release of glycogen and decrease the rate of  protein and carb digestion (which means a longer time before your fuel can aid in recovery!) 2-3 hours after your workout This is when you can have a proper meal, which includes protein, complex carbs (sweet potato, rice etc) and fats. Ginger and turmeric are perfect to include with this meal as they have anti-inflammatory properties which will lessen the effects of muscle damage that the Open workout may have done to your body. Hydration If there was ever a time to up your hydration game it is now! Guaranteed that without hydration, your performance during the CrossFit Open won’t go as well as it could. The workouts themselves will significantly decrease your electrolytes. Up your regular water intake (we recommend our clients aim for 3L per day), include coconut water in your post workout nutrition (is a carb) and add himalayan salts to your water as this will increase hydration and get in more minerals to your system. As we heard from James Newbury during our Open Nutrition  FB Live event. Stick with what you know. If your current diet works for you then don’t make drastic changes. Now is not the time to reduce calories, try new foods or or add new supplements. Sudden changes in diet can cause your body to retain water, have a negative impact on your performance or both. Have a game-plan. Ensure you have a supply of any supplements you want to use and prepare your meals ahead of time. Hope this helps and gives you some ideas of how you can optimise your nutrition for your next Open workout. Good luck for 18.2 x
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